Wednesday, May 27, 2009


 "Emergency communications" is another reason for disaster mongers to cut your mic or cell phone.   While this is infinitely annoying and intrusive; privacy, technology and  A/V nerds are not without recourse.

FEAR NOT because obscure basement hogging ham radio operators have suddenly become a challenge to DHS, as "opposition" if they so much as cough without an FCC license.  This reminds me of when DHS decided that Mule skinners needed port of entry TWIC cards in tourist traps.  Only in America, land of WAYYY more force than is necessary.

At least HAM-talk Live! Arkansas might be more eventful while DHS stacks paperclips and figures out the cheapest way to get drunk after work.

The Turner Radio Network has obtained the complete radio interoperability guide for the Department of Homeland Security, issued by the DHS office of emergency communications. The guide, issued just days ago, includes updates for the entire nation through March 10, 2009. [We're way late, but you should still read it.]

This 76 page guide lists the radio frequencies, repeater input / output / talk-around frequencies, trunked radio network details including CTCSS codes for "private line" carrier squelching, satellite communications codes, radio programming instructions and more!

In the event of a national emergency, - or the round-up of "dissident" citizens -- this is how the various agencies of the federal government will communicate with each other AND with various agencies of the state and local governments.

Thanks to this guide, we'll know what to tune-in, so as to monitor what they've begun doing and, if need be, be able to plan in advance to jam those frequencies if the government tries to attack the citizenry or round-up "dissidents."

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